Personal tools
You are here: Home Research K-12 Education Immigration/Immigrant Students When Families Are Deported: Schooling for US-Citizen Students in Mexico

When Families Are Deported: Schooling for US-Citizen Students in Mexico

Authors: Mónica Jacobo, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas and Bryant Jensen, Brigham Young University
Date Published: February 28, 2018

This paper summarizes existing research, analyzes response efforts by the Mexican government, and recommends ways federal and state governments in the U.S. can partner with Mexican institutions to meet the educational needs of the estimated 600,000 US-citizen students attending preschool through high school in Mexico.
Related Documents

ABSTRACT

When Families Are Deported:  Schooling for US-Citizen Students in Mexico

 

Since 2009, more Mexican immigrants are leaving than coming to the United States. This includes voluntary returns as well as deportations. Because migration historically is a family matter, the US-born-citizen children of return migrants are a rapidly growing population in Mexico. Currently there are an estimated 600,000 US-citizen students attending preschool through high school in Mexico—between 2 and 3% of their total student population. Many of these students are English-dominant, encounter challenges accessing and fitting into Mexican schools, and aspire to return one day to the US. We summarize extant research, analyze response efforts by the Mexican government, and recommend ways federal and state governments in the US can partner with Mexican institutions to meet the educational needs of US-citizen students in Mexico.

 

This working paper was presented at a forum, "The Impact of Immigration Enforcement Policies on Teaching and Learning in America's Public Schools," in Washington, DC on February 28, 2018. 

To view the other research and forum agenda, go HERE

 

In compliance with the UC Open Access Policy, this report has been made available on eScholarship:

http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4zc8b0nh

Document Actions

Copyright © 2010 UC Regents