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Integration and Diversity

Research in this section explores the impacts and benefits of racial and ethnic diversity in education, as well as resegregation trends and remedies in our nation's public schools.

Related publication: The Integration Report - a monthly bulletin focusing on school integration throughout the nation


Recent Integration and Diversity Research

 

Research Item New Jersey's Segregated Schools: Trends and Paths Forward
The report updates earlier research published by the Civil Rights Project in 2013. That report detailed troubling racial and economic segregation trends and patterns from 1989 – 2010. The latest report includes new data from 2010-2015. The research updates public school enrollment trends and details segregation in the state’s schools by race and income. It also includes information about segregation in private schools, examines student enrollment trends in charter schools and their potential to increase segregation, and includes new research on segregation in pre-k schools. A new analysis looks at the plight of students who are English Language Learners, finding many attend schools triply segregated by race, income and language.
Research Item Tough Choices Facing Florida's Governments
Commissioned by the Leroy Collins Institute at Florida State University, the research examines enrollment trends and racial proportion changes in the states’ public and charter schools and charts segregation trends at the state level over time. In doing so, the report makes clear the trend toward the re-segregation of Florida schools and provides a context for Florida’s school segregation, including the impact of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and trends in school accountability and choice.
Research Item Southern Schools: More Than a Half-Century After the Civil Rights Revolution
The Civil Rights Project has been following changes in the South for 21 years, and issuing regular reports on Southern states' schools. For the past decade or so, the Civil Rights Project has labeled the South-- long defined by a black-white paradigm--a tri-racial region. The Southern region used in Civil Rights Project reports includes the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. since its creation 21 years ago. This short research brief is issued with Pennsylvania State University’s Center for Education and Civil Rights.
Research Item Examining the Crossroads: School Segregation in Indiana
To examine how demographic shifts are changing the composition of Indiana’s schools, the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy (CEEP) in collaboration with the Civil Rights Project used Common Core of Data (CCD) school enrollment data, from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), to illustrate enrollment trends within and across school districts in the last few decades (1988–2015).
Research Item Our Segregated Capital: An Increasingly Diverse City with Racially Polarized Schools
This report, the last of a series on 13 states and districts, analyzes the magnitude and trend of racial segregation and its educational consequence among schools in the District of Columbia.
Research Item Brown at 62: School Segregation by Race, Poverty and State
This research brief finds the dramatic increase of double segregation by both race and poverty for the nation's schools. 
Research Item Fulfilling America’s Future: Latinas in the U.S., 2015
At 54 million, Hispanics now make up the largest ethnic minority in the country. Currently, Hispanic girls and women are one in five women in the U.S. and will comprise nearly one third of the country’s female population by 2060. Ensuring they are positioned for success is a fundamental responsibility and an important economic opportunity for the country.
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